London Knife Crime Offences 2007 to 2012

London Knife Crime by Borough 2007 to 2012
21 out of 32 London boroughs saw increases in knife crime offences from the 2010-11 financial year to the end of the 2011-12 financial year leading to a continuation of the four year upward trend. The greatest percentage increases (over +20%) occurred in Redbridge, Merton, Hillingdon, Richmond, Lambeth, Islington. Moderate reductions (better than -10%) have occurred in Enfield and Wandsworth.
Lambeth with 1006 knife crime offences in 2011-12, a 28.8% increase (additional 187 offences) over the year, now has the highest level of knife crime in London, with Southwark coming the second highest with 961 knife crime offences.

While the level of stabbings – knife offences that have led to injury – has remained relatively unchanged with a 4% decrease from 2010-11 (4,133 offences) to 2011-12 (3,970 offences); it is likely that the 10% increase in personal robbery from 2010-11 (32,848 offences) to 2011-12 (36,138 offences) contributed to the increases in overall knife crime offences, as knives are regularly used to threaten and intimidate robbery victims.

Table of London Knife Crime Offences by Borough 2007 – 2012

BOROUGH Knife Crime 2007-08 Knife Crime 2008-09 Knife Crime 2009-10 Knife Crime 2010-11 Knife Crime 2011-12
% change over yr
Barking and Dagenham 384 354 397 391 461 (+17.9%)
Barnet 364 340 404 357 393 (+10.1%)
Bexley 170 193 136 154 160 (+3.9%)
Brent 623 504 547 512 575 (+12.3%)
Bromley 265 323 286 282 276 (-2.1%)
Camden 474 318 349 426 440 (+3.3%)
Croydon 595 491 542 508 566 (+11.4%)
Ealing 585 489 567 528 504 (-4.5%)
Enfield 554 446 533 577 514 (-10.9%)
Greenwich 509 414 373 435 396 (-9%)
Hackney 660 548 509 539 506 (-6.1%)
Hammersmith and Fulham 372 277 304 307 286 (-6.8%)
Haringey 633 505 495 490 552 (+12.7%)
Harrow 215 216 181 190 221 (+16.3%)
Havering 187 203 205 222 231 (+4.1%)
Heathrow Airport 1 0 0 0
Hillingdon 367 342 266 262 336 (+28.2%)
Hounslow 345 25 262 335 341 (+1.8%)
Islington 445 464 409 443 544 (+22.8%)
Kensington and Chelsea 194 185 150 159 167 (+5%)
Kingston upon Thames 133 137 116 101 106 (+5%)
Lambeth 719 662 692 819 1006 (+22.8%)
Lewisham 580 498 498 650 676 (+4%)
Merton 218 177 239 223 299 (+34.1%)
Newham 980 597 788 774 764 (-1.3%)
Redbridge 396 407 316 307 432 (+40.7%)
Richmond upon Thames 109 75 97 80 100 (+25%)
Southwark 827 725 880 961 920 (-4.3%)
Sutton 182 182 163 150 130 (-13.3%)
Tower Hamlets 556 481 433 496 630 (+27%)
Waltham Forest 631 545 618 625 603 (-3.5%)
Wandsworth 383 365 404 448 396 (-11.6%)
Westminster 536 529 458 575 638 (+11%)
TOTAL per financial year 14192 12347 12617 13326 14170 (+6.3%)

knife crime offences updated to 2013 on this link
source MPS 2012.

Knife Crime: All offences of Murder, attempted murder, threats to kill, manslaughter, infanticide, wounding or carrying out an act endangering life, GBH without intent, ABH and other injury, sexual assault, rape, robbery where a knife or sharp instrument (defined as any instrument that can pierce the skin) has been used.
Simple possession is excluded (For example, when a police search results in a discovery of possession of a weapon). Please note: data includes where a knife was ‘threatened but not seen’ from April 2008 onwards.

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6 Responses to London Knife Crime Offences 2007 to 2012

  1. Michelle hart says:

    Stabbing and knife crime are just part of the rich tapestry of living in London. You gotta take your rough with your smooth. If it was all safe it would end up as boring as Chelsea. Safe yes but full of boring tossers drinking champaign. Brixton and Lambeth are one of the most exciting and creative places in London. The mix of poverty, youth, different races and not following all the rules all the time does create some awful tensions, some nasty crimes and pain and distress but most of the time you avoid certain places at certain times and your ok. London has shitholes but they also tend to be places that have a real energy and vibe. Where it becomes safe, the arseholes move in and destroy. Look at islington, nottinghill, Camden and now shoreditch.. People moved there for the vibe but because they made it safe the area then died.. Imagine a London that is safe everywhere, safe for Henriettes and Tarquins to drink in coffee shops and parade their £1000 handbags.. Yeurch. What rather my chances with the crack heads any day.

    • Gary k says:

      There is a real and growing threat from the better off against the poor, and the old against the young. An immoral transfer of capital and assets from those who have little to those who already have too much. The implicit contract between the state and the poor has been broken and the state has been an accomplice, even an advocate of the greatest theft of wealth from the majority to a rich minority.
      Bankers and non-dom non-tax payers are robbing Londoners of their homes and communities, buying up properties and turning thriving places with families into gentrified wastelands devoid of life or character.
      Any agreement to modify our behaviour because we were supposed to be in this all together is now broken. We all get poorer and driven out of our homes by politicians transferring our money to bankers and loan sharks so they can lend it back to us at high interest rates. The state has broken the contract with us, so all gloves are off in how we respond to them.

      • Natasha Sheene says:

        I think everyone is angry at bankers, banks and politicians who colluded with the banks to transfer billions of our money to banks and bankers who paid themselves staggering amounts for robbing from the general public. This widespread theft from every single person in the uk has led to real world consequences, including reductions in policing, collapse of health services, old people not getting care and young people losing opportunities and jobs. Despite our fury at these bankers and politicians who are getting flights, lunches and bottles of bollinger from bankers. It is not a basis to tolerate knife crime to keep bankers out of communities in London .
        Knife crime tends to affect the poorests in London and the poorest parts of London. No one in their right mind would want an increase in stabbings in Brixton, Peckham or Edmonton.
        Gloves off to f–king bankers sure, and there should be a public outcry and demonstrations outside their houses and head offices. So definitely no to greater knife crime or stabbings BUT maybe it’s time for the guillotine for the likes of Bob Diamond from Barclays

    • BAACP says:

      Wow !!!…and to think that you have the right to vote as well !!…I have never heard such absolute rubbish as what you have said.
      Give me the boring place any day, rather than your pathetic excuse for excitement. I guess you must be a white socialist who wants to be part of the hip community, but with a ‘get out ticket’.
      If you want excitement please leave us in London alone and move to Mexico or anywhere else…PLEASE !!

  2. Francis says:

    The number of stabbings in London for 2011-12 was 3970 but total knife crime offences in London for 2011-12 was 14170. Fourteen thousands sounds so much more scary than four thousand but the scariest part is that both keep going up. And no one seems to have a bloody clue how to get them down. Thuggish, selfish and cruel behaviour is taught to young people by feral politicians and corrupt business. Young people act out the behaviour of their elders and what they see in the people at the supposed top of the system is corruption, greed, manipulation and a callous disregard for others.
    You know what the system is now so rotten and so fixed that young people should take any opportunity now to fight back against it.

  3. Joe says:

    Brixton isn’t dangerous. American cities churn out more murders in one neighboorhood than all of London does combined. (And with half the population)

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